Frankly, The Folksy Magazine


For Folksy Collection – The Designers Part 2

by Emily. Average Reading Time: about 4 minutes.

forfolksybanner_madelarge

Here at Folksy, we thought it was about time that we collaborated with some of our favourite designers. So this Winter, we’ve commissioned eight of them to create a set of functional items that reflect the beauty and diversity of Modern British Craft. Following Wednesday’s post we are very proud to introduce you to the final four Folksy designers we worked with.

To get your hands on one, or all, of these creative collaborations visit Folksy.

Finbar Lucas (Fink Furniture) – Trivet, Sheffield

For Folksy Collection - Trivet
For Folksy Collection - Trivet

Finbar Lucas
Finbar Lucas

Even the biggest success stories have humble beginnings. Over a decade ago, Finbar Lucas borrowed £100 from a friend to buy a saw- now he’s taking on staff to keep on top of his workload. Despite the huge demand, Fin’s pieces all have a unique story behind them. By using locally sourced timber from tree surgeons and the Peak District National Park, the designer can often pinpoint the exact tree from which an item is made.

Limiting wastage is Fink Furniture’s main priority, saving offcuts and turning them into something new is all part of Finbar’s grand plan. He says that his work is the result of careful thinking and careful making.

Our design brief caused a lot of head-scratching for the artist, who’s used to making much larger commissions. The seemingly simple trivet takes 26 steps to make, but we think it’s worth it. Each is made from a unique combination of locally sourced or reclaimed ash, oak, sycamore or beech wood and has been beautifully crafted for your kitchen worktop.

Sarah Pendrick (TillyMoss) – Kindle Cover, Sheffield

For Folksy Collection - Tweed Kindle Cover
For Folksy Collection - Tweed Kindle Cover

Sarah Pendrick
Sarah Pendrick

Here at Folksy, we like our digital devices to be well-dressed, that’s where Tillymoss comes in. This kitchen table industry began in 2008 when Sheffield-based Sarah Pendrick needed a way to keep working whilst raising her family. Inspiration for her designs comes from an array of sources; a chatter with some friends, trips to vintage shops and Radio 4 all help her creativity flow…

Highly organised, Sarah has her name down on studio waiting lists and would love to expand production beyond her home. Often sourcing fabric locally, Sarah is always reading up on new textiles, designers and techniques.

Simplicity is the key to Sarah’s success and we love the rustic look of the Kindle cover she’s created for us. It was a bit more fiddly to make than her macbook sleeves, but she’s happy with the finished result and we think you will be too.

Heather Dewick – Notepad, Sheffield

For Folksy Collection - Notebooks
For Folksy Collection - Notebooks

Heather Dewick
Heather Dewick

Deciding whether her craft is a business or love affair is a tricky task for bookbinder Heather Dewick. After training as a museum conservator, Heather worked as a gilder and ceramic restorer before falling into bookbinding. Blurring past and present, she now makes new, unique books and notepads whilst restoring slightly scruffier ones…

Her favourite piece of equipment is a 1920’s blocking press which does all her lettering, using old letterpress type, heat, pressure and pigment foils. Many of her tools are at least second hand and Heather relishes using equipment that has been ‘broken in’.

Working collaboratively with Folksy was exciting for Heather and she inundated us with samples and fabric swatches before settling on the final design.

Stephen Bretland & Jen Sandiford (Loglike) – Folksy Badges, Dee Valley, Wales

For Folksy Collection - Folksy Badges
For Folksy Collection - Folksy Badges

Jen Sandiford & Stephen Bretland
Jen Sandiford & Stephen Bretland

Loglike is a creative partnership, run by Jen & Steve. Started in London in 2005, Loglike recently relocated to a rural spot in the picturesque Dee Valley in North East Wales. Vibrant & quirky Llangollen is just down the road, with wild pheasants, green, green moss, old slate quarries and tonnes of local character(s) in between.

The Folksy badges are a playful re-interpretation of the graphic labels from old thread reels. Keeping the vintage feel, but replacing the original brand name with ‘Folksy’.

It has been a real pleasure working with these designers on the The Folksy Collection and we look forward to commissioning more from other great Folksy makers throughout the next year. It’s a great new way of promoting the talent we have on the site and we are very proud to be able to showcase some of them in this new and (hugely!) exciting way.